Keep Your Dog Healthy Through Middle/ Senior Age

I am super excited to introduce you to a guest blogger, Mark, who loves dogs (and all pets) just as much as we all do! He has taken time out of his busy schedule to write about how to keep your dog healthy through middle/senior age. Want more information regarding dogs? Check out his site: ourdogsworld101.com or his Facebook page. It is definitely worth the read!

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How to Keep Your Dog Healthy Through Middle/Senior AgeHow to Keep Your Dog Healthy Through Middle/Senior Age

Dogs experience age-related problems and challenges as they get older. Usually, a dog is considered senior when it reaches seven years of age. Thinking about such changes begs the question, how to keep your dog healthy through middle/ senior age.

Consider taking these amazing steps to improve their health. By doing your part to keep your senior dog healthy, you will allow them to give you many years of companionship. Follow these tips and your middle-aged/ senior dog’s health will be assured.

Dog Food, Dog Bowl, Dog Kibble, Dry Dog Food, PawsHealthy Food and Nutrition

Diet is a very important point that contributes to the overall health of your fur buddy. For senior dogs, the nutritional requirements usually change and evolve. All middle age/ senior dogs have specific nutritional needs based on breed, age, weather, metabolism, and activity level.

The middle-aged/ senior dogs are prone to many health issues including arthritis, weight gain, cognitive issues, and appetite loss. Their diet greatly affects the quality of their life. These health problems can be affected or improved by the daily diet you feed.

Healthy seniors need more protein to maintain muscle mass. Many middle/ senior dogs need more protein, fibre, or other nutrients to ensure their bodies are well taken care of. You should give middle age/ senior dogs a diet that is tailored to meet their needs. You can consult your vet to select the best diet for your middle-aged/ senior dog’s specific needs.

Regular Vet VisitsMedicine, Veterinary, Equipment, Ear Examination, Dog

You should take your middle-aged/ senior dogs for regular check-ups at the vet’s office. Regular vet visits give your vet the chance to evaluate the overall health of your senior dog. You will also get the chance to discuss any unusual behavior your senior dog is displaying. Your vet will identify irregularities in case your fur buddy has any issues.

The vet will assess the general health of your middle-aged/ senior dog. These vet examinations can detect problems in older dogs before they become life-threatening. Regular vet visits improve the chances of a longer and healthier life for your dog.

Pill, Gel Capsule, Medicine, Health, Cure, DrugIntroduce Dietary Supplements When Appropriate

If your senior dog is not getting a complete and balanced diet, it may develop dietary issues. You can introduce supplements into your dog’s diet. Dietary supplements will not take the place of a healthy diet but will be an additional support to a healthy life.

You can give joint supplements to help keep your dog’s joints from hurting. Also, omega-3 fatty acids help with brain, skin and joint health.

Be cautious about giving human supplements to pets. Your senior dogs need dietary supplements if they’re suffering from arthritis, hip dysplasia, neurological problems, or poor coat conditions. Your vet can also assess whether your middle-aged/ senior dog needs a supplement or not.

A Comfy Place to LiveDog, Pet, Bed, Animal, Border Collie, Sleep, Cute

Arthritis and hip and elbow dysplasia are common issue for older dogs. These dogs deserve a comfy place to relax and sleep. A quality orthopedic dog bed can ease their arthritic joints while helping them stay cozy and comfortable. These beds are designed to provide extra support to your dog’s joints and bones.

You must provide a warm, comfy, and quiet place for relaxing and sleeping. Choose a low-traffic area in your house for your senior dog to relax and sleep. During winters, provide them cozy blankets to keep them warm. Also, keep their space clean and free of germs.

Dog Bath, Resigned, Wet, Soapy, Grooming, AnimalRegular Grooming

Regular grooming and careful weekly examinations are essential for your aging dog’s overall well being. Regular grooming can help you to spot bumps, lumps, wounds, and potential health problems on your senior dog’s skin.

Grooming also helps to remove any loose fur due to shedding, dirt, debris, or ticks and fleas. You should arm yourself with the right grooming tools for your senior dog. Make grooming a positive experience for your senior dog, filled with praises and rewards.

Regular Exercise and Mental Stimulation Strength, Dog, Golden Retriever, Strong, Exercise

Senior dogs should be given regular exercise and mental stimulation to avoid health issues. Regular physical activities will strengthen your aging dog’s muscles, enhance circulation and improve their heart and brain function. Always choose a physical activity that is appropriate for your dog’s age and stamina.

Mental stimulation also plays a big role in keeping your dog healthy. Try to provide ample opportunities for mental challenges to keep your dog young at heart and prevent boredom.

Pit Bull, Senior Dog, Senior, Portrait, Dog, MuttMaintain a Healthy Weight

Maintaining your senior dog’s weight is one of the easiest ways to increase his life expectancy. Healthy weight is a major factor that contributes to your dog’s overall well-being.

Obesity in senior dogs increases the risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, arthritis, difficulty breathing, skin problems, and other conditions. It can shorten your dog’s life expectancy and decrease their quality of life.

Sudden weight loss in a senior dog is also a source for concern. Hyperthyroidism, diabetes and kidney disease are common causes of weight loss in senior dogs.

What are Physical Signs of Aging in Dogs?Dog, Pet, Old, Old Age, Elderly, Gray

Dogs show a variety of signs of aging besides a graying muzzle. Some hallmarks of aging in dogs include:

    1. Slowing down or difficulty getting around
    2. Increased barking
    3. Cloudy eyes or difficulty seeing
    4. Stiffness
    5. Awful breath due to gum disease or tooth decay
    6. Weight fluctuation

It’s important to note that physical signs of aging might look different in dog breeds.

Quick note: Contrary to the popular belief, dogs do not age at a rate of 7 human years for each dog year.

What problems are more common in senior dogs?

It’s easy to spot the outward signs of aging in dogs. Here are a few common health problems in senior dogs:

    • Hearing loss causing varying degrees of deafness
    • Vision loss due to tissue degeneration in the eyes
    • Joint problems
    • Dementia/Cognitive Dysfunction: When dogs lose cognitive function as they age
    • Cancer: It accounts for almost half of the deaths of dogs over 10 years of age
    • Heart disease
    • Kidney problems
    • Obesity
    • Gastrointestinal issues

Aging should not be painful for your furry companion. For your senior dog’s health-related questions, always consult your veterinarian. They can make the best recommendations for your dog.

Final Thoughts

Just like us, age is not a disease for dogs. Although senior dogs may develop age-related problems, good care allows them to live healthy lives in their senior years.

Remember, when you bring home a furry companion, you are committing to a long-term relationship. As a loving dog parent, these tips will help your middle-aged/ senior dog to stay healthy.

You can’t make your senior dog live forever, but you can help your furry pal live the healthiest life possible. A healthy senior dog can save you from a lot of stress and vet visits. All you need is to make some effort to support a healthy life for your senior dog.